Category Archives: Online Fundraising

Social Media Policies – NPQ Newswire

Members of the Turtle Creek Chorale, a thirty-four-year-old predominantly gay group with more than 200 performers, are using social media platforms like Facebook to voice their frustrations about the organization and its social media policies. The Chorale is not alone in its struggles to perfect a social media policy; many nonprofits are wondering how to write these short but complicated documents.

Social media policies are supposed to protect both the organization and the employees (or, in this case, dues-paying volunteers). When written well, social media policies provide the necessary balance of common sense rules (such as no profanity), organization specific protocol (don’t share confidential information), and overall guidance (be transparent). When written poorly, social media policies can lead to confusion and the perception—correct or incorrect—that individual rights are being curtailed. There are several websites which offer sample social media policies but few which provide accurate guidance as to what works and what does not.

Read the more about the case of the Turtle Creek Chorale and social media policies on the Nonprofit Quarterly website.

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#Trends in #Online #Giving

The internet has changed the way we do many things. It has changed the way we shop, the way we bank, the way we teach. It has even changed philanthropy. eBay Deals and eBay Giving Works recently came out with an Infographic listing sixteen stories they believe prove the “internet has a heart.”  These stories do prove that online giving is alive and well. They also illustrate three potential trends or “hot spots” in online giving: disaster response, inspiring stories, and the few nonprofits savvy enough to channel the power of viral philanthropy.

Trend #1: Disaster Giving
Online giving is particularly effective in times of natural disaster. We saw this following the earthquake in Haiti. The Red Cross raised millions of dollars in a very short time frame using methods that are still largely untapped by many nonprofits: Twitter and mobile phones. The immediacy of disaster-based needs and the visual images of damages shown on TV are powerful motivators for philanthropy. The Infographic indicates that the eBay Giving Works program drive raised more than half a million dollars in support of relief for victims of the 2013 tornado in Oklahoma; and that GoFundMe has raised more than $3.3 million for victims of the bombing at the recent Boston Marathon.

Trend #2: Inspiring Stories
The internet loves a good story. You may have seen on Facebook or Twitter the compelling story of Billy Ray Harris, a homeless man from Kansas City who returned a diamond ring. That story went viral and more than $191,760 in donations poured in for Mr. Harris through GiveItForward.com. In a similarly touching story, a man from Nairobi inspired more than $80,000 in donations in less than twenty-four hours after being slashed in the face trying to defend his orphanage. These stories have the power to capture the hearts and open the pocketbooks of many.

Trend #3: Savvy Nonprofits
In other cases, it seems that nonprofits that are savvy about online giving can actively participate in creating the “perfect storm” for online giving. For example, more than $1.4 million was raised via Charity: Water when soon to be nine-year-old Rachel Bechwith asked that in lieu of gifts, friends and family helped bring clean drinking water to developing nations. Her wish was fulfilled after her passing. In another case, more than $200 thousand dollars was raised for Doctors Without Borders by a FirstGiving campaign sponsored by Reddit/Atheism. The Infographic does not tell the story of how the online campaigns were created or executed, but the focus on a nonprofit’s mission as opposed to an individual such as Mr. Harris is key.

Nonprofits should take note. Not all nonprofits work in the area of disaster relief but most can tell a compelling story. These stories, besides being potentially viral online giving opportunities, are touching and speak to our common humanity. They are a motivating factor in giving.

The money given to the man in Nairobi and to Mr. Harris will change a few individual lives but will not affect the lives of the many other homeless men nor will it improve the safety of other orphanages. However, nonprofits who educate themselves about online giving have the potential to channel the viral impact of these stories by raising money for the organizations and programs that will make a lasting change.

 

Note: part of this blog ran as a newswire report for the Nonprofit Quarterly.

I’ll have cookies, granola, and some greater good, please

Examples of social enterprise: Girl Scout cookies and "Your Choice Brands" Granola

Examples of social enterprise: Girl Scout cookies and “Your Choice Brands” Granola

Social enterprise is one of the hot new buzz words these days. Other buzz words include social entrepreneur, impact investing, philanthrocapitalism, and social innovation. These words sound really exciting, maybe a bit foreign.

Don’t panic. Social enterprise is less confusing or foreign than it sounds. In fact, we see it almost every day. . . After all, it is Girl Scout cookie season.

Girl Scout cookies are a prime example of social enterprise:

  • There is a profit created by the sale of cookies.
  • There is a social good realized when the girls learn entrepreneurship and when the money from the sales provides funding for the overall program.

Not so scary anymore, huh?

Now, let’s talk about practice. There are two primary ways in which a nonprofit can be or have a social enterprise:

1) Earned Income: nonprofits engage in social enterprise activity when they create earned income. These business-like activities create a profit for the agency which then is reinvested to further the mission. For example:

  • A nonprofit theater company charges for a ticket to a performance.
  • A nonprofit hospital charges patients for services.
  • A disaster preparedness agency sells earthquake kits.

2) Creating a for-profit company: nonprofits can actually create and own a for-profit company.The for-profit provides a revenue stream for the nonprofit corporation.

There are lots of other types of social enterprise which I’ll discuss in further detail in other posts. These include cause marketing, L3C corporations, Benefit Corporations, and cross-sectoral partnerships.

In case you’re curious, the granola pictured in this post is from a for-profit social enterprise (L3) called “Your Choice Brands.” Consumer can log onto a website and donate a portion of the proceeds from the purchase to the nonprofit of their choice. . . I’ll tell you more about these types of social enterprises another day.

The bottom line though is that social enterprise is not rocket science and you don’t have to be Gandi-like to be a social entrepreneur.

Get your head out of the sand! Write that social media policy!

The benefits of social media are tremendous. Millions of dollars have been raised online and countless acts of advocacy been performed.

It’s exciting. And mindboggling.

Yet, despite the many benefits, social media also comes with significant risks. These risks include employee privacy, employee safety, labor relations and HR issues, brand identity, client confidentiality and so much more. Because of the ever-evolving nature of social media, we don’t even know what some of these risks will be.

It’s a scary situation, one that makes many CEOs want to bury their head in the sand.

Social media polices are one way to provide guidance to staff and ensure we avoid major pitfalls. So. . . it is critical that we get our heads out of the sand and write that social media policy!

Here are three tips to help get you going.

First: Don’t let funders pressure you!
Nonprofits are being encouraged by funders to outreach to clients via social media. For the nonprofits that have not written a social media policy, this can be dangerous. The risks to engaging in social media increase when we engage in direct client outreach. If you begin client outreach without thinking it through properly, you’re asking for trouble.

Before you outreach to clients online, make sure you:

  • Have a social media policy in place;
  • Have trained staff; and
  • Know who will and how to respond to a social media crisis.

Second: Write that social media policy!
Many CEOs aren’t familiar with social media tools and thus are reluctant to provide governance in the form of policies. This is understandable but dangerous. Instead, CEOs should use the staff resources at hand including: HR Director, IT Director, Program Staff, Marketing/Development Director, “digital native” staff, and others. Gather your team together to first identify potential risks and then craft the policy.

When you write a social media policy, be sure to include:

  • A statement of purpose, values, and/or ethics;
  • An outline of who can/cannot officially engage in social media on behalf of the organization;
  • References to any relevant internal and external polices;
  • Any branding requirements;
  • A separate policy for staff engaged in social media as a part of their job and all staff engaged in social media for personal use;
  • A list of staff who should be contacted in case of questions, emergency, policy violation, etc.; and
  • A date for when the policy will be reviewed.

Third: Help your employees understand their three voices.
It is important to help employees understand they have three main voices: official, professional, and personal. Understanding the distinction between these voices can help them to make wise social media decisions at work and in their personal lives.

1)     Official: My official voice is the role I am given by an employer. My job description will indicate what I can and cannot say on behalf of the organization.

2)     Professional: My professional voice is the image I want to portray in the professional world. This might include a Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn profile I create specifically for the purpose of career networking.

3)     Personal: My personal voice is who I am outside of my job. It is who I am with my friends and family. On social media, this might be a Facebook profile I share with friends and family only. Many choose to keep this information on strict privacy settings. If I choose to include my professional contacts on my personal social media pages, I’ll probably be more cautious about what I share.

This isn’t as easy as it looks. The distinction between these three voices may appear clear, but online, the boundaries blur quickly. We can use privacy controls and disclaimers (i.e. “these thoughts are my own and do not represent my employer”) to distinguish between our voices; but, unfortunately, there is no guarantee that professional networks won’t see personal information and vice versa.

The bottom line is this: “What happens in Vegas, stays on Facebook.” . . . We should all proceed with caution.

One final thought. Even if you don’t employ union staff, it important to understand what the National Labor Relations Board is saying in regards to social media. (Link to: http://www.nlrb.gov/)

Now . . . Get your head out of the sand! It’s time to write those policies!

Moving Millennials to Donate: Easier than You Think

A few months ago I wrote about the Chains of Habit many nonprofits are forming by reaching out to and stewarding the millennial generations. These chains of habit begin by establishing awareness about the mission and then move through increasingly higher asks:

1) volunteering
2) small donations
3) encouraging peers to become involved/donate
4) larger donations

This process, which mirrors any donor stewardship process, is undergirded by the emerging forms of electronic communication: enewsletters, social media, and more.

The internet is now the flour that thickens and binds the sauce.

Many CEOs feel unsure of how to proceed but, today, we have updated information to guide our approach. The 2011 Millennial Donor Survey results have been released and they are worth paying attention to.

Here are a few of my key take-aways from the report.

1) 70% of millennial have raised funds.
Wow! Think about our nonprofit boards. How many of you have 70% of your board members raising funds? Not many, I’d be willing to wager. However, this next generation appears to be more comfortable with fundraising than their predecessors. This makes sense. Partially because of (and partially evidenced by) social media, the millennial generation is a very connected group. They want to engage with one another and with others who share common interests. When they’re passionate about something — your mission?!? — they happily share.

Nonprofits can harness this fundraising might by encouraging millennial to join boards and by creating low price-point opportunities for donating/fundraising.

2)  70% said they would share cool events on Facebook.
This is in comparison to the 30% who would share that they had donated or the 34% who would share they had made an impact. They don’t want to brag. They don’t want a plaque on the wall. They want to engage. . . and it has to be cool.

Nonprofits should take note. Rubber chicken dinners and standard forms of donor recognition aren’t enough. It’s time to get real and get creative.

3) 90% had never donated through Facebook.
This is shocking to me, especially given the fact that most of them preferred to give online. Does this mean that nonprofits are not effectively asking through Facebook? Or, instead, does it mean that nonprofits are effectively engaging through Facebook AND getting the donors to click-through and donate via their website. I don’t know but I hope it’s the latter.

Either way, nonprofits can look at ways to improve the numbers of millennial s (and others) donating through Facebook. The survey mentioned safety concerns as one of the reasons only 10% were donating through Facebook. Don’t let that stop you. You can make the ask via Facebook but offer links so that the actual donations come via your website.

The millennial generation is here to stay as is this new fangled internet thing. Thanks to the Millennial Donors Survey, we have more information about how we can reach this increasingly powerful population. I’ve offered a few key facts here but there are many more included in this report. It’s definitely worth a read.

If you’ve had success reaching out to the millennial generations, I’d love to hear about it. Please post your comments here or share them on www.facebook.com/JennysJunction.

 

 

 

6 Steps to Take Before You Start an Enewsletter

Many nonprofits start an enewsletter and then think through how they are going to manage it day-to-day. Like most things, this is not the optimal way. Here are 6 crucial steps to take before you start an enewsletter.

 1) Chart your course.
Before you start an enewsletter, ask some questions:
-who is my audience(s)?
-what do I want from them?
-what do they want from me?
-how often will they want it?
-what resources (staff time, money, etc.) can I devote to this?

2) Choose a platform.
There are many enewsletter platform providers you can use. Popular ones include Constant Contact, MailChimp, and Vertical Response. I use MailChimp because it is easy to use, inexpensive, and comes with great technical support. They also have a sense of humor which helps when dealing with the (sometimes) technologically challenged people like myself.

3) Design a template.
The major platform providers are all set up to allow the average user to design their own template. You can customize it with your colors, logos, etc. or you can use a standard template they’ve created. Some agencies prefer to have their enewsletter look like their print newsletter or website. If you want that level of customization, ask a graphic designer to help. I’ve used The Design Stylist many times and the results are astonishing.

When building your template, think about what you want to share and how often. For example,
-how many stories or notices will your enewsletter include?
-will there be a special section for events? For resources?

4) Create an editorial calendar.
Create a 3-6 month calendar outlining what you might write about for each of the stories in your Enewsletters. This isn’t set in stone but will give you a framework with which to work. It will also help you see if you have enough content for the enewsletter. When deciding on topics, keep it relevant. If appropriate, incorporate seasonal items, holiday references, and even the odd, “International day of chocolate covered insects” references. You can also see how your enewsletter content will cross-pollinate your other marketing such as social media, press outreach, and more.

5) Build your enewsletter subscriber list.
It is critical that your subscriber list opt-in. This means that you have their explicit permission to contact them. The best open rate success stories I’ve had with clients have come when two things happen: a) subscribers opt-in and b) content is customized to meet the audiences’ needs. This is to say: don’t buy a list. Take the time to build your own.

Here are a few pointers on building a strong subscriber base:
-put a ‘subscribe now’ link in your email signature line and on your website.
-check and see if your platform provider will set up an app on your Facebook page for fans to opt-in. MailChimp does.
-offer a goodie (like an ebook or a ticket for an opportunity drawing) for subscribers

6) Keep up the good work.
If you’ve done steps 1-5, you are well on your way. Don’t lose momentum! Consistency is as important to success as is content.

What is your best tip for a stellar enewsletter? Share it here or on Facebook.

Was this helpful? Sign up for my enewsletter and receive more tips, trainings and special discounts. Just click “Follow” in the box on the right at the top of this post.

 

Chains of Habit: Online Giving and the Millennial Generation

Online giving is a pivotal way to attract and retain the next generation of donors. According to the Millennial Donor Survey, 49% of Millennials of gave online.  This survey included responses from nearly 3,000 people between the ages of 25 and 35. It provides valuable insights for nonprofits wishing to use online philanthropy to create chains of habit.

Communicating with Millennials
Millennials expect to give and prefer to give online.  According to the survey, the top 2 preferred methods of communication are via the web and email. They also expect nonprofits to use electronic means of communicating – social media, websites, enewsletters – to keep in touch. For this generation, the print newsletter is a dinosaur.

Soliciting gifts from Millennials
According to the survey, the top 2 preferred methods of being solicited for a donation are via a personal request and online.

Online giving allows for easy peer-to-peer asks which result in larger giving circles. It is ideal for capturing the attention of this generation and it is ideal for nonprofits who want to increase their donor pool.

Of the Millennials who gave online, about half gave $150 or below. The Millennial generation is the least financially established of all the generations. Their gifts are often small; however, they are making the commitment to give to social causes. They are forming chains of habit.

Chains of habit
We know that past behavior is a predictor to future behavior. What we do today, we are likely to do tomorrow. When we graciously (and creatively!) solicit and accept smaller donations online, we are paving the road to long term donor relationships.

“Chains of habit are generally

too small to be felt until they are

too strong to be broken.”

~Samuel Johnson

 

What are YOU doing to create the chains of habit?
In order to help nonprofits maximize online philanthropy and create ‘chains of habit, I’ve created Online Giving 2012: Your Best Year Ever. This yearlong webinar course will help you master the core competencies of online philanthropy – online relationship building, enewsletters, social media strategy, online giving campaigns, branding, and more.

You will:

  • Create your 2012 Online Giving Road Map
  • Develop an engaged social media community
  • Deliver an enewsletter donors wait for
  • Raise funds via a successful online giving campaign

Monthly Course Webinars include:*

Jan: Online Giving ~ Are you Ready? (30 min – free)
Feb: Creating Your Roadmap for Online Giving
Mar: Leaving Your Mark ~ Branding, SEO, & the Web
April: You’ve Got My Ear ~ Donors and Enewsletters
May: Online Cultivation ~ Donors and Social Media
June: The Anatomy of an Ask ~ Designing Your Online Fundraising Campaign
July: Testing the Waters ~ Warming Your Audience with Small Online Asks
Aug: Bonus Class ~ Participants vote on the topic
Sept: PowerHour ~ Review and provide feedback on classmates’ campaigns
Oct: It’s You, Online ~ Using Your Personal Brand to Maximize Fundraising Nov: Final Push ~ Harnessing the best fundraising month of the year
Dec: Bonus Class ~ Participants vote on the topic

Save $225!
Purchase the yearlong series for $275 by January 31st and save $225! That is a $75 savings off of the full price of the year ($350) plus two FREE 30 minute coaching sessions valued at $150.  What a deal!

Click here to Register for the full year

Are you ready to harness the power of online giving?
Receive two free 30 minute coaching sessions when you register now for Online Giving 2012: Your Best Year Ever!  These coaching sessions can be used at any time throughout the year.

Want more information? The first webinar is free! This webinar Online Giving: Are You Ready will articulate the core competencies needed for a successful online giving campaign. It will lay out the road map for the course and show you exactly what you can do to make 2012 your best year ever.

Click here Register for the first webinar

If you have questions about the course, please ask me on Facebook or send me an email at jenniferamandajones@gmail.com.